HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_TITLE

HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_SUBTITLE

Aerial Photography CUSTOM UAV AR


Flying your drone safely and legally in Canada
Kevlar Carbon fiber CineStar
Rules for recreational drones If you fly your drone for fun and it weighs more than 250 g and up to 35 kg, you do not need special permission from Transport Canada to fly.
PILOT MUST NOT FLY:
. higher than 90 m above the ground
. closer than 9 km from the centre of an aerodrome (any airport, heliport, seaplane base or anywhere that aircraft take-off and land)
. within controlled or restricted airspace
. within 9 km of a forest fire
. closer than 75 m from buildings, vehicles, vessels, animals, people/crowds, etc. . where you could interfere with police or first responders
. at night or in clouds
. if you can’t keep it in sight at all times
. if you are not within 500 m of your drone
. if your name, address and telephone number are not clearly marked on your drone.
Follow the basic safety rules below. Not doing so may put lives, aircraft and property at risk. If you fly where you are not allowed or choose not to follow any of the rules below, you could face fines of up to $3,000.
Do not fly your drone:
higher than 90 m above the ground closer than 75 m from buildings, vehicles, vessels, animals, people/crowds, etc. closer than nine km from the centre of an aerodrome (any airport, heliport, seaplane base or anywhere that aircraft take-off and land) within controlled or restricted airspace within nine km of a forest fire where it could interfere with police or first responders at night or in clouds if you can’t keep it in sight at all times if you are not within 500 m of your drone if your name, address, and telephone number are not clearly marked on your drone. The list above is an overview of the new rules for recreational drone users. Consult the Interim Order Respecting the Use of Model Aircraft for the full list of provisions. Members of the Model Aeronautics Association of Canada (MAAC) who operate at MAAC sanctioned fields or events are not subject to these rules.
Flying for fun? New rules for recreational drone users (PDF, 4 MB) Tips for recreational drone users:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/ca-opssvs/Infographic-New_rules_for_recreational_drone_users.pdf
Fly your drone during daylight and in good weather. Keep your drone where you can see it with your own eyes – not through an on-board camera, monitor or smartphone. Make sure your drone is safe for flight before take-off. Ask yourself, for example: Are the batteries fully charged? Is it too cold to fly? Respect the privacy of others. Avoid flying over private property or taking photos or videos without permission. Non-recreational drone: If you fly your drone (or UAV) for work or research, or if it weighs more than 35 kg, you must get a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC). The SFOC tells you how and where you are allowed to use your UAV. For more information on the SFOC, read Getting permission to fly your drone. Does Transport Canada approve schools that can teach me to fly my UAV safely?
We do not approve UAV training organizations or recognize certificates for UAV operations.
If you do not follow the requirements of your SFOC, we may fine up to $3,000 for a person and $15,000 for a corporation.
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/flying-drone-safely-legally.html?utm_source=TC_Homepage&utm_medium=Carousel&utm_campaign=UAV2017-ENG